Armourdale and CID Pump Station Modifications

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In 1993, flooding caused water to reach the top of the levees in Kansas City. To protect businesses and residences from future floods, the United States Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) has embarked on the process of raising 60 miles of levees along the Kansas River, as well as a small section of the Missouri River.

The Affinis team was selected to review and analyze the 16 pump stations connected to the Armourdale and Central Industrial District levees. Supported by teaming partner HDR, we were tasked with determining which pump stations needed to be modified to accommodate the increased uplift and structure loading that would be caused by a raised levee. Our team also assessed the pump capacity for each pump station based on revised hydrology and the increased pumping head needed for the proposed levee raise. We started by reviewing USACE’s analysis of each pump station and then, partnered with Geotechnology to assess the existing concrete conditions. Our survey crew also evaluated the site, gathering details for each, so we could have an accurate understanding of the entire area.

Then, using that information, our design team looked at how the existing structures could be strengthened, specifically evaluating the walls and floors of each. To reinforce the pump stations, we considered several solutions. One was adding more reinforced concrete to thicken the walls and floors. Another was bracing the structure with struts between the walls. In developing the designs, we used various combinations of these ideas. During design, it was determined that several of the pump stations would require new pumps and motors based on age or insufficient pump capacity.

The age of the pump stations varied greatly. Some were over a 100-years-old. Others were 30 to 40 feet deep with small interior spaces, which impacted the designs. Design of the modifications was challenging due to the compressed design schedule, age, and condition of the existing pump stations. Our team had to be certain any proposed fixes would be constructible, fit within the pump station, and be cost-effective.

Construction will start in October 2020 and is scheduled to be complete in 2023.

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